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Garden Room Maintenance: 3 Top Tips

NattyShedGirl Buyers Aftercare, Garden Room Buyer's Guide, Garden Room FAQs, Garden rooms Leave a Comment

Maintaining your Garden Room is paramount to the longevity of the building. The better you look after your Garden Room, the more likely it is to be passed down through the generations. Over the years, I’ve seen all forms of neglect and lost love for these beautiful creatures. So I thought I’d best help you keep the magic alive, when it comes to your Shedlife, by sharing some top tips. There are 3 crucial ways to keep your Garden Room in tip-top condition and stop it from becoming foosty, run down and haggard. And they are: TREAT VENTILATE REPAIR   1. TREAT First things first: whatever the external cladding, it’s always best to use some form of treatment on it. …

image of a beautiful garden room

What is the best construction for a Garden Room?

NattyShedGirl Garden Room Buyer's Guide, Garden Room FAQs, Garden rooms, Timber Building FAQs Leave a Comment

If you’re familiar with Gillies and Mackay, you’ll know we don’t muck around with specification, especially when it comes to our Garden Rooms. We know what you need when it comes to staying warm, dry, loved and comfortable in your Shedlife. That’s why we have developed the best specification of Garden Rooms to withstand the Scottish climate. Grant and I love nothing more than to barter back and forth with new ideas, new technologies and a whole world of possibilities for design, specification and techniques. Our Garden Rooms are made with a 5-tier wall specification that looks and sounds like this… External Cladding As standard, we will always use 19mm thick tongue and groove Redwood which has been tanalised to …

Finished Half Build - Steven Marshall Photography

DIY Garden Room: The Half Build

NattyShedGirl Buyers Prep, Garden Room Buyer's Guide, Garden Room FAQs, Garden rooms Leave a Comment

The Half Build Garden Room Listen… It’s okay. You can tell me, I’m totally cool with it. It’s only natural. You’ve got the skills, you’re right handy around the house and this might just be the dream project you’ve always wanted! I’m talking about ‘Do-It-Yourself Garden Rooms’. We’ve made 100’s of Garden Rooms for our amazing G&M customers over the past 30 years. So it comes as no surprise when people start to realise the potential of doing some of the work themselves, not least to save a tidy penny, but also because they want to. There are pros and cons, as well as different stages to consider, but we will discuss all of the important aspects in this blog …

3 reasons your Summerhouse might be leaking

NattyShedGirl Buyers Aftercare, Summerhouses Leave a Comment

No one likes a leaky Summerhouse! And our Scottish weather is so unpredictable, with a fair bit of rain to contend with. But that wouldn’t be the cause of your Summerhouse leaking. There are other factors to consider, as I mention in this wee video below: VIDEO CHATTER Now, depending on age, there may be a time where your Summerhouse will spring a leak and where this leaking comes from is what you need to know. 1. Slab Base The first one, and the most common one, is when a Summerhouse sits on its slab base and then the customer has put a decorative slab around the outside of it. And put it right up to the Summerhouse. What we …

New garden building: Dealing with difficult neighbours

NattyShedGirl Buyers Prep, Timber Building FAQs Leave a Comment

Dealing with difficult neighbours when you’re thinking about getting a summerhouse for your garden can seem like a nightmare. Well, let me put your mind at ease… check out this wee video where I explain that there’s really not a lot they can do about it!

Shed vs Summerhouse: What’s the difference?

NattyShedGirl Comparing Shed Options, Shed Buyer's Guide, Sheds, Summerhouse Buyer's Guide, Summerhouses Leave a Comment

The way I look at it is a shed is for a practical use. It’s something that is either going to be there for storing your garden equipment or there for practical working space. By practical I mean messy pretty much. Vehicle maintenance, tinkering about with tools. That type of thing. Pottery would work. All those sorts of things that are a bit messy. That’s what a shed is ideally for. It’s nice and practical. The timber is structural and its main priority is to be structural sound. The timbers are pressure treated (green) and rough sawn. They’re not decorative, clean or finished. Being a sturdy strong building is primarily what the sheds are about.