What Does Roof Pitch Mean?

What Does Roof Pitch Mean?

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When buying a garden shed, knowing what roof you want can make all the difference to the overall look.

You see, there are two options available, and they are:

  • Apex
  • Pent

One is a superior pitch which allows the water to run off easily, the other, when combined with a steel box profile, can do just as good a job – but for a totally different look.

Still not sure what I’m on about? That’s okay, I explain it all in this short video clip right here…

Video Transcription

Today I’m going to speak to you about roof pitch. It’s something I say quite a lot, and customers are like, what are you talking about?

What I am talking about is whether or not you want an apex roof, which is the A-frame shaped roof, or whether you want a pent roof, the flat-ish mono-pitch lean-to roof.

That’s the two options - a flat roof or a pointy roof - whichever one you prefer, whatever fits your space best or personal preference.

With the pent roofs, we usually work off the longest panel being the front and back, which allows for better storage. But the apex is actually the superior pitch as it allows the water and snow (and whatever else) to run off quite readily. It’s like a 27-degree pitch on the standard sheds. The pent roof is only a 9- degree pitch and requires a steel box profile covering to maintain its Gillies and Mackay guarantee.

We do not advise pent roofs to have felt on them, as the water tends to lie on that type of roof. So regardless of what type of felt you have, it’s going to get its way in somehow. We would advise putting on something a bit more substantial, i.e. box profile, which is a steel sheeting.

So that’s the two options, apex or pent. One is the superior pitch because it allows the water to come off more readily. However, that can be combatted in the other if you use steel box profile instead of felt.

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